5 Ways to Control Mosquitoes in Your Yard

People often ask us how they can get rid of the mosquitoes that are in their yard or home.  By the time you have a large mosquito population to deal with, you are too late to deal with them the best way:  Prevention.  The ideal approach for controlling mosquitoes is to never let the population explode in the first place.

Everyone knows that mosquitoes are annoying, but there are serious health reasons for keeping mosquito colonies from forming around your yard or home.  The advent of the Zika virus is just the latest in a number of mosquito-borne issues that present real health risks.  Mosquitoes also carry more common diseases like West Nile Virus, and more deadly afflictions like Malaria.

Here are five things you can do to help keep the mosquito population down, and keep your yard as mosquito-free as possible.

Eliminate all Standing Water

The single most important thing you can do to manage mosquito populations is to manage standing water in your environment.  Mosquitoes love standing, still water.  To them, a nice little puddle that doesn’t go away for a few days is the perfect home.  Larger bodies of water, like rivers and lakes, are actually less attractive to them as long as the water is clean and moving (many lakes have slow currents, and even when they don’t the water is often constantly moving around).

Be sure to eliminate (or treat) any of these breeding grounds in your yard.  The obvious ones are puddles and small ponds, but there are many other places that you should look as well.  It has been said that mosquitoes can breed in as little as a half inch of water!

  • Landscape ponds
  • Lawn or yard ornaments with standing water features
  • Buckets that accumulate rainwater or runoff
  • Puddles
  • Bird baths
  • Ruts that hold standing water
  • Edges of lakes or ponds where dirty water pools. (a simple sandy or grass shoreline is best)
  • Clogged gutters and downspouts, leaving exposed, pooled water
  • Plant bowls saucers
  • Other items that can collect rainwater or runoff – such as a wheelbarrow that is not turned upside down

Some of these are pretty easy to fix – such keeping buckets indoors and dry, or turning your wheelbarrow over.  Others are not as easy, but perhaps even more important.  What if you have a low spot in your yard that routinely puddles?  It might make sense to build that area up for proper drainage, even if it means hauling in fill and resodding.  What if you live near a pond?  Work with your municipality to keep the shoreline free of standing, shallow-pooled water.

If You Cannot Get Rid of Water, Consider Treating It

While the best, and typically most green, solution to mosquito breeding grounds is to eliminate the water, sometimes this can be very difficult.  Areas like drainage ponds, runoff drains, or some landscape features are inherently designed to hold water.  What, then, can be done to be sure that water does not become the preferred home of a mosquito colony?

While prevention is always preferred to treatment, treatment of mosquito breeding grounds is strongly preferred to allowing a thriving group of the bugs to reproduce and spread illness.  There are a few was to treat standing water, the simplest being an every-30-day treatment that can prevent larvae from growing.  Mosquito Dunks and Bits are the most popular and easiest way to to this.  These come in a solid format –the “Dunks” (which can be found here) – and can treat a large pond for a month or so.  They are about as easy to use as possible — you simply toss one into the water, and it slowly floats around and treats the water.  While manufacturers claim they are organic, we can only comment that from a layperson’s viewpoint, they sure seem safe.  Plus, we have a point-of-view that the effects of mosquito diseases are likely worse than the effects of throwing one of these into your pond.

Mosquito Dunks have a cousin called the Mosquito Bits, found here.  The only difference is that dunks are slow-release and meant to be used to treat water for 30 days.  Bits deploy all of their larvae-fighting agents within 24 hours or so.

There are also liquid forms of water treatment, which may work more quickly but typically need to be reapplied every week or so.  The active ingredient is Sodium Lauryl Sulfate.  The jury is still on the safety of SLS to humans – but it is the same ingredient found in things like soaps, shampoos, and beauty care products.

As for standing water that comes in the form of a hottub or pool, treatment is a little easier.  Make sure that you are keeping the pool covered if possible.  Perhaps the most critical thing you can do is keep the poo

Control Tall Grass and Shrubbery

weeds

Tall grass doesn’t help mosquitoes breed, but it gives them a comfortable place to live.

Mosquitoes like to rest in tall grass, plants, and shrubs.  This is a little different than the water issue, because water is actually where mosquitoes breed.  Eliminate water, and you make it hard for mosquitoes to reproduce.  Long grass, on the other hand, is where mosquitoes like to spend their resting time.  That is why you often encounter mosquitoes when you take a walk in long grass even though the rest of a yard or park might seem mosquito-free – you are stirring them up.

Keeping grass cut to a length of 5 inches or less will prevent mosquitoes from congregating there.  You will simply be forcing them to go somewhere else, but it is still better than having the bugs around humans and spreading disease.

If you are unable to eliminate the tall grass – perhaps you are going for a native look, it is on a hillside, or it is not your property – then at least put key human activity areas such as playsets or outdoor dining areas away from the long grass patch.

Use Mosquito-Repelling Plants

Compared to the others on this list, make sure you temper your expectations for how much plants can keep mosquitoes at bay.  Still, many people are ­looking for organic and green ways to deal with mosquitoes, and there is no greener way than by planting something.  There are some plants that mosquitoes tend not to like, and using them might help reduce the number of mosquitoes in your environment.  It won’t eliminate them, and it certainly won’t reduce the mosquitoes’ ability to reproduce, but there could be some slight effect.

Note that you always need to compare each plant to your hardiness zone, growing conditions, and soil and sunlight requirements, but here are some plants known to be unattractive to mosquitoes.

  • Citronella Grass. Citronella oil has been shown to have strong mosquito-deterring qualities, and it comes from Cintronella Grass.  The downside for many is that this is a grass that typically grows only in the southern, warmer climates – but it still should do well in the mosquito-heavy areas of Florida, Louisiana, and Texas.
  • The fragrant plant with purple flowers is great in most gardens, even outside of its mosquito benefits.
  • Yes, this is the same basil that you keep in your spice rack.  Basil is an excellent herb to have around, useful in many recipes, and easy to grow in most parts of the country.
  • Lemon Balm. Note that it is considered invasive, so if you plant it you will need to keep it contained.
  • Hardy plant that grows well in many environments.

Again, don’t expect these grasses to be any kind of end-all, be-all to your mosquito problems, but if used with some of the other techniques you might see a positive impact.

Consider Strategically Fogging Key Parts of Your Yard

The image of fogging a yard – someone in a mask and gloves, spewing a fog or mist into the air – is not exactly one that evokes environmentally friendliness.  Still, fogging has its place, even for the typical homeowner.  We think that some people whose yards are particularly attractive to mosquitoes may want to consider the occasional fogging.  This means using a product with the active ingredient of pyrethroid or cyfluthrin to treat key areas.  Those key areas include the following:

  • Shaded areas
  • Shrubs and long grass
  • Areas within 12-15 feet of key human activity (e.g. patio, playset)

Given the chemical compound you should take care when applying these chemicals, but when used in moderation and in a targeted manner, they can help to make an impact on the localized mosquito population.  Just note that you aren’t really killing the mosquitoes or preventing them from breeding, so you are basically just kicking the problem down the street.  Still, if you have children playing outside, or are about to have an event in your backyard, we’d rather see a touch of chemical be smartly used than have someone get West Nile because of a bite.  While these chemicals can be applied with garden sprayer-like equipment and Cutter makes a pretty simple do-it-yourself variety, if you have doubts about your ability to administer safely we would suggest hiring a professional.

Mosquito Killers: Zappers, Magnets

You can also try a mosquito killer, magnet, or zapper, a device that actually will kill mosquitoes upon contact.  While the best solution is to do something that will actually keep mosquitoes away, a mosquito killer will help control the population once it already exists.  Not a root-cause fix, a zapper or magnet can be effective if you want to use your patio or pool, but it is too late to take the preventative steps against mosquito breeding.

If all else fails, just be sure you keep the mosquitoes from biting you, by using mosquito repellent or spray.  Those bites can be more than just annoying – they can make you sick!

Conclusion

There are a few things you can do to reduce mosquitoes in your yard, park, or local environment.  Just remember that some of these are mosquito repelling techniques – and we would really like to see you eliminate the breeding grounds.  That is where true population control can occur.  To that end, eliminating standing water is the most critical thing you can do, and it should be done repeatedly.  The other techniques are useful as well, but really pale in comparison to making sure you aren’t giving the bugs an easy way to reproduce.

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